Wednesday, June 03, 2009

Where is borderline between reasonable caution and irrational fear?

The cause of the Flight 447 tragedy may never be known. The flight data and voice recorders might not be found, nor enough of the wreckage. There will be educated guesses of course but none of the certainty that comes from a thorough investigation. In the news yesterday an accident investigator not involved in this crash, mentioned that two Qantas flights experienced uncontrolled loss of altitude due to a malfunction in the fly-by-wire system. Did something similar contribute to the 447 accident?

I fly Air France several times a year, and mainly on flights to the US. The Airbus 330 is on those routes. Perhaps I need to add a third criterion to my planning with schedule and cost.

Kim

5 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

True, the cause of this accident may indeed never be known. And certainly one should avoid flying (or anything else, for that matter) if it looks like there's really bad stuff going on.

At the same time, as is well known by everyone, you are far, far more likely to be killed while puttering around in Waldo than you are in any airplane of any size anywhere in the world. Panic is NOT in order.

5:21 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Found this quote, even though it's US-based:

"Your lifetime risk of being killed in a car crash is one in 88, three times greater than being the victim of a homicide — and more than 50 times greater than dying in an airplane crash."
http://www.aaany.com/CarandTravel/Web_Only_Stories/Risky_Business_.asp


Thais

10:53 PM  
Blogger Gillette said...

Such odd developments...think they found it, then oops, no. The families must be going nuts.

I am of the mind that it is what it is, can't control what I have no control over. I just listen to my gut and if it says no, I listen.

7:32 PM  
Anonymous VJ said...

Make certain your plane's Pitot tube is not frozen & therefore blocked. That might help a bit. Via Bloomberg on these suspicions on the vital airspeed indicators. Essential for the auto-pilot to work properly, and hence the computer navigation & avionics systems too.

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601170&refer=home&sid=aiKtGlY0GhZc

But it really does sound like those early deadly early de Havilland Comets too. Somethings just do not add up. Here's hoping they find enough pieces to really chase down the problem. Cheers, 'VJ'

5:46 AM  
Blogger Camilla said...

Although statistically there's a significantly lower chance of meeting an untimely end in an aircrash, I think I'd prefer to be hit by a bus or snuffed out in a car accident that experience the sheer terror of a malfunctioning aircraft.

I don't like the idea of the lack of control, or the period of time that elapses between realizing the inevitability of my death and it's occurrence!

10:57 AM  

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